« Come walk with us! JDRF Walk, October 20 in San Francisco... | Main | EVERYBODY IS WALKING FOR DIABETES… »

Comments

I am a T1D of 37 yrs on 4-5 multiple daily injections. I am interested in comments about gastroparesis. For the last 6 months I have a sort of indigestion like food lingers in my stomach for 3-4 hours after a meal. Some foods are particularly troublesome raw apples. However my bG's are still fine, am I just in a honeymoon period as this progresses?? I am new to this site and blogging in general so I will try searching more but thought I would post this to get the ball rolling.
Thanks for comments Jim

Personally, I think Pfizer's treatment, or rather their mistreatment of partner Nektar was not the wisest choice the company could have made. Pfizer's drug pipeline is very weak, and the company may need to rely on partnerships to fill in the many voids in their drug pipeline. Do they really think the way they treated Nektar in this process is going to make them an attractive partner?

I don't think so.

Too bad, because this will hurt Pfizer's turnaround efforts that could involve partnerships going forward.

Personally, I think Pfizer's treatment, or rather their mistreatment of partner Nektar was not the wisest choice the company could have made. Pfizer's drug pipeline is very weak, and the company may need to rely on partnerships to fill in the many voids in their drug pipeline. Do they really think the way they treated Nektar in this process is going to make them an attractive partner?

I don't think so.

Too bad, because this will hurt Pfizer's turnaround efforts that could involve partnerships going forward.

Kelly,

You left out GREED. Exubera was priced far far higher than the analogs that are much more effective and easy to dose, to say nothing of R insulin.

Why should doctors prescribe an exceedingly expensive form of insulin that would make a small decrease in A1c when five minutes of training could get people over the fear of needles and give them access to a cheaper form of insulin that offers great control.

When I was interviewed by Business Week explaining why I wouldn't take Exubera, I tried to convince the photographer to take a picture of me injecting with a big smile to show how painless the new short, thin needles are. She wouldn't do it.

It was a shame. My needles are painless enough I often am not sure I got in unless I look.

Kelly

These are all good points. And speaking as someone with pulmonary issues, I wouldn't have touched this if I was paid to use it.

I also think that Pfizer didn't think enough about product design issues. The device was just plain huge, not really attractive and dosing was complex.

Look at what Adaptive Path did with the Charmr concept for insulin pumps. If Pfizer had engaged them for Exubera I'll BET that the device itself would have attracted additional users.

Diabetes is already such an intrusive disease that making some beautiful and easy to use might have made a small difference.

And I agree with you, I do hope that Pfizer continues to try innovating on diabetes treatments.

The comments to this entry are closed.